Ideas for Improving Expressive Language Skills

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During my years working in a middle school, I often spent much of my time helping teachers develop activities and lessons geared towards improving expressive language skills. Traditional school lessons contained many ways to assess and measure receptive language skills, or how a student understood the content. What I felt needed to be addressed was the students’ expressive language skills, or how well they were able to explain the content they learned or how well they were able to put the content into their own words.

The ability to express concepts, thoughts and ideas can be difficult for teenagers in general. However, if the teenager has been diagnosed with an expressive language disorder, being able to use words to express concepts and ideas can be even more challenging. For easy ideas to work on and practice expressive language skills with students, check out the article I wrote for Carolina Pediatric Therapy’s Parent Partner Blog:

Focus On Expressive Language: As a Parent, What Can I Do to Help My Teen?

Put Your Family Members to Work this Holiday!

If you are like most families, your house will soon be full of aunts, uncles, and cousins running around playing and having fun. If you have young children who struggle understanding and expressing language, check out the blog post I wrote for Carolina Pediatric Therapy.

Build And Strengthen Language Skills At Home This Holiday Season Ages 1 To 3

Happy Thanksgiving!

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Who? What? When? Where? Why?

The ability to appropriately answer abstract questions is an important developmental language skill. In order to accurately answer these questions, children must understand what each question word is asking.

See below for normal developing ages for answering “wh” questions:

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A great way to help children develop and refine their ability to answer “wh” questions is through story time with books that are simple in plot, repetitive in writing style, and include lots of great visuals.  There are a lot of children’s books out there and many of them for younger children lack the content needed to elicit these “wh” questions. Many younger children’s books are simply images with vocabulary images and labels. While these books are helpful, they don’t promote the development of more abstract language understanding.

However, I came across a book that’s great for young children and promotes the development of “wh” questions.

You can find it on Amazon by clicking the link below:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0692735348

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Mimi and Moto was written by Nancy Gerloff and Mark Augustyn. http://mimiandmoto.com/

 
I also recently created a visual resource to help children more effectively answer “wh” questions for my Teachers Pay Teachers site. I’ve been using this idea for years, but have always just used blank paper and basic drawings to teach the different “wh” types. I’m sure my clients will appreciate not having to view my awful stick figure drawings. You can find it here:
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